Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Pharmacologic therapy of olfaction disroders induced by COVID-19 upper respiratory infection. (English)

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Postviral olfactory disorder refers to the sensorineural olfactory loss caused by upper respiratory tract infections. With the increasing awareness of olfactory or gustatory dysfunction as a potential early symptom of coronavirus disease 2019, postviral olfactory disorder has been attracting much attention. Postviral olfactory disorder is the most common type of olfactory disorder, especially among women aged over 50 years. Systemic or topical corticosteroids have commonly been used for treating this disorder, but the mechanism of corticosteroid action is unclear. Other medical treatment options such as alpha-lipoic acids and caroverine that stimulate nerve growth factor expression or prevent glutamatergic neurotoxicity have also been used. Although these drugs have been found to be useful in the treatment of postviral olfactory disorder in previous studies, the efficacy has not been statistically proven through a meta-analysis. Recently, olfactory training has been introduced in the treatment strategy for postviral olfactory disorder. It is a safe option without side effects that can be used for treating olfactory disorders caused by upper respiratory tract infections. Further rigorous studies are needed to determine the efficacy of the combination of drug treatment and olfactory training. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of the Korean Medical Association / Taehan Uisa Hyophoe Chi is the property of Korean Medical Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)